HP Inc: 3D printing will be democratized in India

HP Inc. believes 3D printing has a total addressable market (TAM) of USD 12 trillion globally, while India alone could be a TAM of USD 1 trillion by 2025.

HP_Inc_3D_Printing_will_be_democratized_in_India.jpg

HP Inc. intends to make 3D printing scale across the country, and has expanded its 3D printing portfolio towards this end by introducing color printer platforms such as the new Jet Fusion 300/500 series.
 
Going to market with 3D printing as a services as well as buy model, HP Inc. believes it is only a matter of time before additive manufacturing is used across all spectrum of verticals, both in B2B and B2C domains. 

Related: Is 3D printing on the verge of mainstream adoption?

Sumeer Chandra, managing director, HP Inc. India, observed, “With over 200 engagements in place, and around three active 3D printing partners in India, HP Inc. is all set to take its offerings to the SMBs and turn it to mass scale.”

Related: 3D printing in manufacturing: Where does India stand?

The company, as part of its partner and innovation ecosystem, is working with Mumbai-based Imaginarium, Noida-based Ad Tech and also with national value added distributor Redington. 

While HP Inc’s 3D printers are compatible with all existing 3D CAD, CAE software and can interface easily with each other, the organization also clarifies that it will not be competing with the CAD/CAE players. It will drive the next stage of converting the design prototype to the form. 

On whether 3D Printing will validly transform Indian enterprise as a low cost alternative to traditional technologies, particularly in manufacturing and in healthcare use cases, Rob Mesaros, head 3D printing and digital manufacturing, HP APAC and Japan, opined, “As the technology evolves and democratizes, it will remain low volume and high value.” HP Inc. remains committed to transforming Asia’s USD 6 trillion manufacturing industry, with its diverse collection of global brands and contract manufacturers, he added. 

As additive manufacturing is often referred to as 3D printing; HP Inc. is also investing its efforts in helping customers in compliances, industry standards as well as certifications in order to make the manufactured parts compliant in every manner.

Besides this, the company is also involved in conversation with leading universities and state governments for setting up research labs, Centers of Excellence, among other initiatives. 

HP Inc: 3D printing will be democratized in India

HP Inc. believes 3D printing has a total addressable market (TAM) of USD 12 trillion globally, while India alone could be a TAM of USD 1 trillion by 2025.

HP_Inc_3D_Printing_will_be_democratized_in_India.jpg

HP Inc. intends to make 3D printing scale across the country, and has expanded its 3D printing portfolio towards this end by introducing color printer platforms such as the new Jet Fusion 300/500 series.
 
Going to market with 3D printing as a services as well as buy model, HP Inc. believes it is only a matter of time before additive manufacturing is used across all spectrum of verticals, both in B2B and B2C domains. 

Related: Is 3D printing on the verge of mainstream adoption?

Sumeer Chandra, managing director, HP Inc. India, observed, “With over 200 engagements in place, and around three active 3D printing partners in India, HP Inc. is all set to take its offerings to the SMBs and turn it to mass scale.”

Related: 3D printing in manufacturing: Where does India stand?

The company, as part of its partner and innovation ecosystem, is working with Mumbai-based Imaginarium, Noida-based Ad Tech and also with national value added distributor Redington. 

While HP Inc’s 3D printers are compatible with all existing 3D CAD, CAE software and can interface easily with each other, the organization also clarifies that it will not be competing with the CAD/CAE players. It will drive the next stage of converting the design prototype to the form. 

On whether 3D Printing will validly transform Indian enterprise as a low cost alternative to traditional technologies, particularly in manufacturing and in healthcare use cases, Rob Mesaros, head 3D printing and digital manufacturing, HP APAC and Japan, opined, “As the technology evolves and democratizes, it will remain low volume and high value.” HP Inc. remains committed to transforming Asia’s USD 6 trillion manufacturing industry, with its diverse collection of global brands and contract manufacturers, he added. 

As additive manufacturing is often referred to as 3D printing; HP Inc. is also investing its efforts in helping customers in compliances, industry standards as well as certifications in order to make the manufactured parts compliant in every manner.

Besides this, the company is also involved in conversation with leading universities and state governments for setting up research labs, Centers of Excellence, among other initiatives.